POLLUTION: A new study from British and U.S. researchers finds pollution from fossil fuels is responsible for one in five premature deaths globally. (Reuters)

ALSO: New Jersey regulators are investigating after data shows that five waste-to-energy incinerators violated state and federal pollution laws while collecting millions of dollars in renewable energy credits. (Politico)

CLIMATE:
• The Biden administration does not plan to revive the Obama-era Clean Power Plan, instead opting for something more ambitious that will take time to develop. (E&E News)
• President Biden’s order for agencies to procure clean power and electric vehicles may require changes to federal rules to implement. (E&E News, subscription)
New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy signs into law a bill that requires local governments to include climate mitigation actions in their master plans. (NJ Spotlight)

PIPELINES:
• Several U.S. senators, including Democrat Joe Manchin, are pressuring the Biden administration to reverse its decision to cancel a permit for the Keystone XL pipeline. (CBC)
• A federal judge delays a hearing on whether the Dakota Access pipeline should continue operating without a key permit to allow Biden administration officials more time to familiarize themselves with the case. (Associated Press)
• Indigenous youth set out on a 93-mile run in sub-zero temperatures in South Dakota to protest the Dakota Access pipeline. (Common Dreams)

OIL & GAS:
Wyoming Gov. Mark Gordon calls President Biden’s indefinite ban of federal oil and gas leasing a “direct attack” on the state, warning that lost revenue will be “devastating” for the state. (Casper-Star-Tribune)
Wyoming towns are grappling with transitioning from fossil fuels after decades of calls to diversify the state’s economy have gone largely ignored. (NPR)
Western U.S. senators introduce a bill that would permanently ban oil and gas drilling in federal waters off Washington, Oregon and California. (National Fisherman)
Texas energy regulators defer the approval of flaring requests by oil companies, likely signalling a more critical look at the controversial practice. (Bloomberg)

POLICY:
• Illinois Democrats introduce the latest version of the Clean Energy Jobs Act, which aims for net zero emissions by 2050 and eliminates coal from the state’s electricity sector by 2030. (State Journal-Register)
• As Kansas and Nebraska officials consider drafting statewide energy or climate plans, advocates in nearby states say they are not always followed closely but still offer an opportunity to shape clean energy policy. (Energy News Network)

STORAGE: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is working on a framework for a “dramatic increase in deployment” of energy storage. (Utility Dive)

WIND: Massachusetts officials and utilities release a draft request for proposals in preparation for procurement of 1,600 MW of offshore wind that would culminate in contracts in the spring of 2022. (Statehouse News Service)

HEATING: New England’s wood heat industry hopes a new federal tax credit boosts efficient systems in an energy source that advocates say is underutilized. (Energy News Network)

COMMENTARY: A Rocky Mountain Institute official and transportation advocate cite California as an example of how inequalities will remain in place by only focusing on electric vehicles to reduce transportation emissions. (Bloomberg)

Ken Paulman

Ken Paulman

Ken is the director of the Energy News Network at Fresh Energy and is a founding editor of both Midwest Energy News and Southeast Energy News. Prior to joining Fresh Energy, he was the managing editor for online news at Minnesota Public Radio. He started his journalism career in 2002 as a copy editor for the Duluth News Tribune before spending five years at the Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Washington, where he worked as a copy editor, online producer, features editor and night city editor. A Nebraska native, Ken has a bachelor's degree from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and a master's degree from the University of Oregon. He is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists and Investigative Reporters and Editors.