Daily digest

Study: FirstEnergy ‘bailout’ would cost ratepayers $4B through 2024

CLEAN POWER PLAN:
• With little chance left of getting a stay on the federal rules, states like Ohio must continue drafting a state plan to achieve compliance despite their opposition. (Midwest Energy News)
South Dakota legislators want the U.S. EPA to reconsider the federal rules to credit coal plants that have already made emissions reductions. (Daily Republic)

OHIO:
• A new study says FirstEnergy’s “bailout” request will cost Ohio ratepayers nearly $4 billion through 2024 and is part of a larger corporate strategy to shift risk onto ratepayers. (Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis)
• TV and radio ads hit the market in Ohio against two utility income-guarantee requests, but the utilities maintain that opponents are “short-sighted.” (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
• 
AEP is considering airing ads to counter the campaign by independent power producers. (Columbus Business First)

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CLIMATE: The Obama administration is set to propose a $1.65 billion, 10-year fund for climate infrastructure as part of its budget proposal for next fiscal year. (ClimateWire)

WIND: A northern Illinois jail looks to install a wind turbine as a way to reduce electric costs. (Associated Press)

COAL:
• The cleanup price tag for coal-ash storage sites around the country — which utility customers may be asked to pay — is pushing into the billions. (Associated Press)
A coal plant in south-central Michigan is closing in June, but the utility is unsure what to do with the property after that. (Hillsdale Daily News)

SOLAR:
• Advocates will hold planning sessions in Wisconsin on best practices for communities to follow when considering large-scale solar installations. (LaCrosse Tribune)
Michigan researchers receive a second patent for an innovative design that makes solar panels cheaper and easier to install. (MLive)
Installing solar panels is already paying off for some Minnesota businesses. (The Daily Globe)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES: Auto analysts in Michigan say the sector’s growth isn’t where it was projected to be five years ago and low oil prices aren’t helping. (MiBiz)

EMISSIONS:
• Michigan officials say Marathon can already increase sulfur dioxide emissions at its Detroit refinery without approval of a controversial permit. (Detroit Free Press)
A new report says most U.S. companies either underestimate or overestimate their carbon emissions as they make efforts to combat climate change. (Michigan Radio)

RENEWABLES:
• Business groups in Michigan are split over whether declining renewable energy prices make the case for or against renewable energy standards. (MiBiz)
• Nearly two-thirds of all new generation brought online in 2015 came from renewables. (Renewable Energy World)

OIL AND GAS:
• Industry officials and Republican legislators say President Obama’s proposed tax on oil to pay for clean transportation infrastructure will unfairly hit consumers. (EnergyWire)
Some economists say levying the tax on oil would require polluters to pay more of the total cost of greenhouse gas emissions. (Climate Central)
After boom times and an influx of workers, North Dakota is starting to empty out. (New York Times)

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SUSTAINABILITY: Corporate officials at Illinois-based Deere & Co. are resisting a shareholder proposal to move the company to net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, calling it “neither reasonable nor feasible.” (Telegraph Herald)

COMMENTARY:
• A recent report offers solutions to the “utility death spiral” concerns that have played out over the past three years. (Midwest Energy News)
An industry group says anti-fracking activists in Ohio ignore the reductions in greenhouse gas emissions that the fuel source has helped achieve. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)

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