U.S. Energy News

Supreme Court rules EPA erred in limiting toxic emissions from power plants

COAL: The U.S. Supreme Court decided Monday that a 2011 EPA limit on toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants failed to properly consider the costs of pollution controls, but the court stopped short of invalidating the rule. (The Washington Post)

ALSO:

GULF SPILL: The Supreme Court will not hear appeals from oil giants BP and Anadarko over potential federal fines for their role in the 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. (The Hill)

CALIFORNIA SPILL: As cleanup continues on May’s oil spill along California’s coast, the state is considering allowing a company to triple its oil production and run the oil through the same pipeline. (The Guardian)

BIOFUEL: Sometime this summer, a United Airlines flight will take off from Los Angeles bound for San Francisco using fuel generated from farm waste and oils derived from animal fats. (The New York Times)

SOLAR:

  • Well-organized advocacy groups flush with money have descended on state capitals in hope of influencing state lawmakers and utility regulators in Southeast solar battles. (EnergyWire)
  • CPS Energy has awarded a lucrative contract to a Colorado-based company to bring “community solar” to San Antonio, Texas. (San Antonio Business Journal)
  • A year after the Iowa Supreme Court upheld the legality of third-party solar projects, the installer who brought the case has filed a complaint alleging Interstate Power and Light has undermined the intent of the court’s decision. (Midwest Energy News)

FRACKING BAN: New York on Monday formalized its fracking ban, making it the only state with significant natural gas resources to ban fracking. (Associated Press)

BOARDROOMS: U.S. oil companies are playing hardball to quash efforts by investors to win the right to nominate climate experts for board seats. (Reuters)

CRUDE: Two companies say they will build 700,000 barrels of new crude oil storage and distribution infrastructure near Seabrook, Texas. (FuelFix)

JOBS:Coal, oil and gas workers need a secure future as the world moves away from fossil fuel use, and governments and companies must plan to ensure any climate deal is fair for all those impacted, a top trade unionist says.(Thomson Reuters Foundation)

COMMENTARY: For the Northeast to address climate change, developing offshore wind is a necessity. (The Boston Globe)

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