Southeast Energy News

Texas is still leading the nation in wind energy

WIND: The Energy Department says the U.S. wind industry is getting cheaper. more advanced, and expanding onshore and offshore with growth in states like Virginia, Texas, North Carolina, and Oklahoma. (InsideClimate News)

MORE:
Texas installed the most wind capacity and was the nation’s top state for  wind power in 2017. (Houston Chronicle)
A conservative Texas think tank is undertaking an intense anti-wind energy crusade even though wind power is politically popular in the state. (Texas Observer)

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SOLAR:
Vivint Solar will begin making solar leases available to its Florida customers. (CleanTechnica)
Three states reduce fixed solar rate charges, which could mean regulators are rethinking solar standards, according to a report from North Carolina Clean Energy Technology Center. (Utility Dive)
Virginia Wesleyan University plans to install a SmartFlower solar system that tracks the sun during the day, producing more energy than fixed panels. (WTKR)

COAL:
Government data shows the U.S. added about 2,000 coal mining jobs since Trump took office, but economists say it’s not statistically significant and the uptick is expected to fade. (CNBC)
Oklahoma is likely to exceed greenhouse gas emissions targets from coal-fired power plants by 2030, according to a research firm’s report. (Muskogee Daily Phoenix)

COAL ASH:
Earthjustice files a lawsuit to get Kentucky to release public records concerning the discharge of coal ash into a lake that’s a source of drinking water. (Lexington Herald Leader)
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit sides with environmentalists who say Obama-era rules on coal ash storage did not go far enough to protect the public. (Utility Dive)
A decade after TVA’s Kingston coal ash spill in Tennessee, workers are suing the company that hired them, saying they were misled about the dangers. (Nashville Public Radio)

NUCLEAR:
SCE&G rate cuts mandated by South Carolina lawmakers over the failed V.C. Summer nuclear project will start for customers in August. (ABC News 4)
Tennessee Valley Authority says the public was not threatened and no injuries were reported at a fire at its Tennessee nuclear plant. (News Courier)

UTILITIES: South Carolina lawmakers meet again to discuss the future of the state-owned utility Santee Cooper. (WSPA)

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CLIMATE: The oil and gas industry proposes Texas build 60 miles of concrete seawalls to protect petrochemical facilities from Louisiana to Houston from rising seas and extreme weather. (Associated Press)

COMMENTARY:
The director of a coal advocacy group says President Trump has delivered on his promises for coal in West Virginia. (Charleston Gazette-Mail)
A lawyer and Sierra Club member says Virginia officials refuse to question Dominion Energy’s deal on the Atlantic Coast Pipeline. (Virginia Mercury)
A solar developer praises Texas for investing in renewables and energy storage. (PV Magazine)

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