Western Energy News

Trade war forces closure of Washington solar panel supplier

SOLAR: A Washington state factory that produces a key component in solar panels is shutting down today because of the escalating trade war with China. (Columbia Basin Herald)

COAL: A Wyoming coal producer’s recent bankruptcy filing is another consequence of how cheaper resources like natural gas and renewable energy are edging out coal. (Utility Dive)

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PUBLIC LANDS: Congresswoman Deb Haaland of New Mexico has become a powerful voice for fellow Native Americans and the protection of public lands from fossil fuel development. (The Guardian)

CLIMATE: Two Oregon universities have withdrawn from a climate change denying group working to oppose the governor’s plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. (The Oregonian)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES:
• Denver’s transit agency pays almost twice as much per mile to power the electric buses that serve a pedestrian mall than it does its conventional fleet, mostly due to high utility demand charges. (Denver Post)
• Arizona Corporation Commission staff have released a proposed implementation plan for a statewide electric vehicle policy that’s being opposed by one utility regulator who says it will lead to higher energy bills. (Utility Dive, Arizona Republic)

CARBON: A handful of Montana ranchers have signed contracts with a non-profit organization that sells carbon credits to companies like eBay and Clif Bar to offset their emissions. (Montana Public Radio)

OIL & GAS:
• Oil and gas development near a national historical park in northern New Mexico has brought an influx of cash for some mineral owners, along with increased air pollution. (Searchlight New Mexico)
• Colorado oil and gas regulators are starting preliminary work on new drilling rules emphasizing safety and environmental protection. (Associated Press)
• A Denver suburb gives preliminary approval to a six-month moratorium on new drilling. (Broomfield Enterprise)
• County officials in southern Colorado are asking for an annual meeting with oil and gas operators in an effort to improve communication between the industry and local government. (Durango Herald)

UTILITIES:
• San Francisco may make a multi-billion offer to buy some of PG&E’s assets. (Bloomberg)
• Customers of a South Dakota utility would see a $6.5 million rate increase under a proposed legal settlement. (Billings Gazette)
• The CEO and chairman of a Washington utility who led its failed merger with a Canadian company is retiring. (The Spokesman-Review)

BIOMASS: Arizona’s largest utility has told regulators that it’s financially feasible for the company to convert one of its coal plants in order to burn forest by-products. (Arizona Daily Sun)

NUCLEAR: A House bill proposes stripping the $116 million requested by President Trump to restart the licensing process at Nevada’s Yucca Mountain. (Las Vegas Review-Journal)

COMMENTARY: A nuclear advocate touts the security of the Nevada National Security Site where the federal government recently shipped plutonium from South Carolina. (Reno Gazette-Journal)

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