U.S. Energy News

U.S. renewable generation doubled in last decade

RENEWABLES: The amount of renewable electricity generated in the U.S. doubled over the last decade, with almost all of the growth coming from wind and solar. (Grist)

ALSO:
An Illinois bill would increase the state’s renewable portfolio standard and let utilities raise rates to pay for renewable projects. (Energy News Network)
• A Nevada lawmaker files legislation proposing to raise the state’s renewable energy standard to 50 percent by 2030. (Greentech Media)

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FINANCE:
• Thirty-three global banks invested a combined $1.9 trillion in fossil fuel companies since 2015, according to a report by environmental groups. (Greentech Media)
• A Massachusetts firm says it has found a way to advance clean energy in underserved communities while benefiting investors at the same time. (Energy News Network)

SOLAR:
• California likely broke a record for utility-scale solar energy production, at one point over the weekend meeting 59 percent of grid demand. (PV Magazine)
• New England’s grid operator projects solar capacity will more than double over the next decade. (Platts)
• A television ad in Iowa backs a bill for a fee on solar customers, saying they don’t pay their fair share to use the grid; the ad is produced by a group that advocates believe is connected to the state’s largest utility. (KCRG, Energy News Network archive)

SMART METERS: Kansas regulators find that requiring utility opt-out programs for smart meters would be difficult and costly. (Utility Dive)

POWER PLANTS: A White House economic report revives the potential for a federal program to bail out coal and nuclear plants. (E&E News, subscription)

NUCLEAR: The Trump administration will finalize $3.7 billion in loans to Southern Company for construction of the Vogtle nuclear power plant in Georgia. (Bloomberg)

OFFSHORE DRILLING: The Trump administration will hold an auction today for oil and gas leases in the Gulf of Mexico. (Reuters)

PIPELINES:
• Keystone XL and Line 3 pipeline delays are hurting Canadian tar sand forecasts and causing some investors to worry. (InsideClimate News)
Enbridge spent $11 million in 2018 lobbying Minnesota regulators in support of the Line 3 pipeline project. (Minnesota Public Radio)
• A federal judge halts work on the PennEast pipeline in New Jersey amid a dispute over eminent domain. (Morning Call)
• Climate activists release a report that says the case for a $1 billion natural gas pipeline in New York has been overstated. (Crain’s)

COAL:
West Virginia and two dozen other states are awarded a combined $291 million in federal grants for mine reclamation. (WVVA, WSIL)
• Federal inaction to restore benefits for coal miners with black lung disease is putting miners in danger. (Associated Press)

HYDRO: Federal regulators seek to balance the flow into a popular New Jersey waterfall with the needs of a hydroelectric plant upstream. (Paterson Press)

WASTE TO ENERGY: Maryland lawmakers advance a bill that would make a Baltimore trash incinerator ineligible for clean energy subsidies. (Baltimore Sun)

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CAP AND TRADE: California’s cap and trade program helps protect South Carolina’s forests by compensating owners for carbon sequestration. (E&E News, subscription)

COMMENTARY:
• An Ohio editorial board says Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposal to boost funding for coal mine reclamation by $5 million “rights a wrong” by the previous administration. (Columbus Dispatch)
• A Vox writer cites Minneapolis’ strong energy efficiency programs and utility partnerships as an avenue to address climate change.

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