U.S. Energy News

Under Trump, corporations increasingly worried about climate change

CLIMATE: Climate change is a growing concern for the nation’s top companies, beating out other economic concerns, according to an analysis of earnings calls. (Bloomberg)

POWER PLANTS:
• The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission unanimously says closing uneconomic coal and nuclear plants does not pose a threat to the U.S. power grid, putting it at odds with the Trump administration. (Reuters)
• American Electric Power’s CEO says any plan to stabilize nuclear and coal plants should be reviewed by utilities to protect ratepayers from rising costs. (E&E News)

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SOLAR: A Nevada utility could soon break the record for the lowest price for solar energy in the nation. (Greentech Media)

WIND:
• Citing concerns about rates, Maine regulators will reconsider a previously negotiated contract for a proposed offshore wind farm; developers say the decision won’t necessarily prevent the project from moving forward. (Portland Press Herald)
• A Minnesota judge’s recommendation to deny a planned $300 million wind project over turbine noise could have a chilling effect on the industry, advocates say. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)

PIPELINES:
A Pennsylvania lawmaker who is challenging the Mariner East pipeline project asks state regulators to post all public comments related to the case online. (Natural Gas Intelligencer)
• Rover Pipeline agrees to pay West Virginia $430,000 for water pollution violations in the state. (Charleston Gazette-Mail)

OIL AND GAS: A new book explores how the fracking boom impacted a small Pennsylvania town. (Marketplace)

GRID: Scientists say the bedrock beneath Interstate 95 could amplify the effects of geomagnetic surges from the sun, making the Northeast corridor uniquely vulnerable to grid disruptions. (Bloomberg)

STORAGE: As California utilities come close to hitting mandated energy storage goals, many are looking to raise the bar even further. (Utility Dive)

NUCLEAR: A South Carolina utility expresses concerns about a critical audit of its failed nuclear project that is the basis for several lawsuits, saying the report could be used against the company. (Post and Courier)

TECHNOLOGY:
Augmented reality devices could help train and assist utility workers, but more study is needed around safety and performance issues. (Midwest Energy News)
• A Silicon Valley fuel cell startup plans to go public, but company officials won’t say how much they hope to raise. (Greentech Media)

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POLITICS: The Democratic National Committee says it will no longer accept donations from fossil fuel companies. (The Hill)

COMMENTARY: Why President Trump would rather not fire Scott Pruitt. (Vox)

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