U.S. Energy News

Under Wheeler, EPA rollbacks expected to continue

OVERSIGHT: The U.S. Senate confirms former coal lobbyist Andrew Wheeler as EPA administrator, who is expected to continue his predecessor’s efforts to roll back environmental regulations. (New York Times)

EFFICIENCY:
A federal court rebukes the U.S. Department of Energy for attempting to sideline an energy efficiency rule on air conditioners. (E&E News)
• New research addresses the challenge of enrolling small and medium businesses in energy efficiency programs. (Energy News Network)

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CLEAN ENERGY:
• Illinois lawmakers introduce a bill to reach 100 percent renewable energy by 2050 with an emphasis on job creation and equity. (Energy News Network)
• Wisconsin’s governor calls for 100 percent carbon-free electricity by 2050 and increased state funding for renewables and efficiency. (Wisconsin State Journal)
Maine Gov. Janet Mills announces plans to form a climate council to guide the state toward 100 percent renewable energy. (Portland Press Herald)

WIND:
After a settlement in Rhode Island, fishermen in Massachusetts are raising concerns about the Vineyard offshore wind project. (Cape Cod Times)
• Oklahoma regulators adopt rules that require wind developers to pay the state utility commission $2,000 per facility in annual fees for oversight. (Oklahoman)

UTILITIES: Virginia regulators narrow the options for companies seeking to buy renewable power by rejecting Walmart’s bid to contract with an alternative power supplier. (Energy News Network)

OFFSHORE DRILLING: The president it set to roll out an offshore oil drilling plan that many Republican state leaders oppose. (USA Today)

PIPELINES:
Tribal leaders say the Army Corps of Engineers didn’t seriously review the Dakota Access pipeline’s potential impact on tribes. (Associated Press)
• Mountain Valley Pipeline developers ask Virginia regulators to stop a process that could revoke the project’s water certification permit. (Roanoke Times)

NUCLEAR:
• Critics raise safety concerns as owners of aging nuclear reactors look to keep them operating far beyond their original licenses. (E&E News, subscription)
• The U.S. Department of Energy will go forward with plans to build a controversial new nuclear reactor some have called a boondoggle. (Science)

COAL: As coal severance taxes decline in Central Appalachia, counties lose funding for government services. (Southerly)

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EMISSIONS: An experimental Texas power plant that captures and reuses carbon dioxide is about to begin selling power back to the grid. (Houston Chronicle)

POLITICS:
• Washington Gov. Jay Inslee will announce his candidacy for president today at a Seattle solar farm, illustrating his focus on fighting climate change. (Seattle Post Intelligencer)
• House Speaker Nancy Pelosi will not forbid members of a climate committee from taking donations from fossil fuel companies. (HuffPost)

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