U.S. Energy News

‘Unprecedented opportunities’ for clean energy after climate deal

CLIMATE:
• The historic deal reached in Paris could mark the shift of when global greenhouse gas emissions started to level off and decline. (New York Times)
• After Paris, the fossil fuel industry faces “massive, costly disruption,” while clean energy industries are looking at “unprecedented opportunities.” (Bloomberg)
Scientists welcome the new pact in Paris, but warn there is no detailed roadmap to achieve emission reductions. (Agence France-Presse)
Meanwhile, the U.S. House passed a bill Friday that would block trade deals from being used to cut greenhouse gas emissions. (Associated Press)
Secretary of State John Kerry defends the non-binding deal, saying it will prompt significant clean-energy investment. (The Hill)
How large corporations have changed their tone to help promote government-enabling public policy. (EnergyWire)

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WIND:
• A new proposal calls for 90 megawatts of wind plus storage 30 miles offshore of New York. (North American Wind Power)
A major wind and transmission project on federal land in Wyoming has stalled since George W. Bush was in office. (Denver Post)
• All six members of Arkansas’ congressional delegation met with Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz last week to raise concerns about a proposed wind-energy transmission line. (Arkansas Online)

SOLAR:
• A major solar installer confirms that it funded a group attempting to discredit Arizona utility regulators often for solar-related decisions. (Arizona Republic)
• The Archdiocese of Baltimore completes a 20-year power purchase agreement with an Exelon subsidiary that would meet 20 percent of the Archdiocese’s energy needs with solar. (Catholic Review)
• A North Carolina town becomes a laughing stock after rejecting a solar proposal amid public testimony including one resident’s claims that the panels “would suck up all the energy from the sun.” (New York Daily News)
• The industry battles a perception that solar is only for the wealthy. (Reuters)

OFFSHORE DRILLING: A new proposal could lead to the first petroleum production in federal Arctic waters. (Associated Press)

BIOMASS: New Hampshire’s largest utility has a biomass plant that can now power 50,000 homes. (Portland Press Herald)

COAL:
• How officials in Utah quietly developed a plan to transport coal to a California coast export terminal. (Los Angeles Times)
• Barges on the Ohio River in western Pennsylvania are diversifying their loads as coal shipments decline. (Trib Total Media)

FRACKING:
• The Obama administration may appeal a federal court ruling in Wyoming that temporarily blocked new regulations on fracking on federal land. (The Hill)
• Fracking creates a new lifeline for a Hare Krishna community in West Virginia. (Toledo Blade)

DIVESTMENT: San Francisco’s pension fund board votes to divest all of its coal holdings and reinvest all $21 million in renewable energy. (San Francisco Chronicle)

UTILITIES: Critics say an Upper Peninsula utility is moving too quickly on a new natural gas plant to displace some coal generation and is not analyzing all cost options. (Midwest Energy News)

OHIO: In addition to income guarantees, FirstEnergy’s “bailout” plan would significantly increase fixed charges and potentially discourage energy efficiency and distributed generation. (Midwest Energy News)

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OIL AND GAS: A company looking to build a $2 billion gas pipeline across parts of Michigan and northern Ohio starts the federal application process. (Associated Press)

COMMENTARY: The two key points climate skeptics miss. (Vox)

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