Daily digest

Utility group says Supreme Court ruling ‘doesn’t really change anything’

CLEAN POWER PLAN:
• North Dakota’s coal industry and top elected officials praise the Supreme Court’s decision to block the rules, and the state will suspend work on a compliance plan. (Bismarck Tribune)
• The Supreme Court’s decision could undermine last year’s negotiations in Paris. (Grist)
Some legal experts say the Supreme Court “opened a door” in which future regulations could be blocked before fully taking effect. (Greenwire)
States vary on whether to halt or continue planning their compliance strategies. (EnergyWire)
A national utility trade group says the Supreme Court ruling “doesn’t really change anything” as utilities will continue to shift to natural gas and renewables. (RTO Insider)

RENEWABLES: Corporations in Michigan seek to overcome policy barriers as they meet companywide goals to run on more renewable energy. (Midwest Energy News)

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SOLAR:
• An advocacy group projects Minnesota’s solar workforce will grow by 20 percent this year. (WCCO-TV)
• Despite the extension of federal tax credits last year, losses by rooftop solar companies have accelerated. (New York Times)
The first national trade association for community solar in the U.S. launched earlier this week. (Utility Dive)

UTILITIES: FirstEnergy and Dynegy attack each other in a Twitter feud. (Columbus Business First)

EMISSIONS: Wisconsin lawmakers propose a bill that would relax the state’s sulfur dioxide emissions. (Associated Press)

PIPELINES: South Dakota lawmakers reject a bill that would have prevented state regulators from issuing permits for pipeline projects before federal approval. (Rapid City Journal)

EFFICIENCY: A new report says an “all hands on deck” approach to energy efficiency could meet 30 percent of the nation’s electricity system needs in 10 years. (Utility Dive)

BUDGET: It’s still unclear what the Supreme Court’s ruling on the Clean Power Plan will mean for President Obama’s climate-focused budget proposal. (ClimateWire)

BIOFUELS: Regardless of the policy future of the Renewable Fuel Standard, gasoline companies would still blend fuels with ethanol anyway. (National Public Radio)

COAL:
• The industry’s decline will continue to happen due to market forces beyond the Clean Power Plan. (Slate)
While criticizing President Obama’s regulations on coal-fired power plants, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell “blocked efforts to rescue health and pension funds on which thousands of retired and disabled miners rely.” (Washington Post)

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FINANCING: A beer distributor in southeast Michigan uses Property Assessed Clean Energy financing to build a 16,000-square-foot solar array. (MLive)

COMMENTARY: Despite this week’s Supreme Court ruling on the Clean Power Plan, the U.S. must continue on a path toward clean energy. (Los Angeles Times)

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