Northeast Energy News

Vermont transmission project may be back in the running

TRANSMISSION: A Vermont-based electrical transmission project passed over for a renewable energy plan in Massachusetts may get a second chance. (VT Digger)

ALSO:
• New York will spend $24 million on two power transmission improvement projects. (Watertown Daily Times)
• Northern Pass plans to file a motion for reconsideration after New Hampshire regulators rejected its permit for the Massachusetts renewable energy project. (New Hampshire Union Leader)

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RENEWABLE ENERGY:
• About 40 towns in Vermont plan to vote on a nonbinding resolution to reduce the state’s dependence on fossil fuels – an effort to send lawmakers a message. (Vermont Public Radio)
• Massachusetts college students and faculty plan to gather Tuesday at the Statehouse to pressure local colleges and universities to obtain 100 percent of its energy from renewable sources such a wind and solar. (Associated Press)
• Secret recordings reveal that a top University of Maine official provided insider information that helped a company land a power contract with the university. (Portland Press Herald)

OIL & GAS: State attorneys general of coastal states are threatening legal action if the Trump administration does not terminate it offshore oil and gas drilling plan. (Washington Post)

NUCLEAR:
• The Connecticut General Assembly has until March 1 to decide whether a nuclear power plant should be allowed to compete for contracts normally only available for solar, wind, hydropower projects. (Connecticut Post)
• A New Jersey proposed law that offers subsidies to nuclear power plants would cost taxpayers more than $4 billion over 15 years, according to an economic analysis. (NJ Spotlight)

SOLAR:
• Sussex County officials in New Jersey are considering legal action following a failed solar project that left taxpayers on the hook for a $2 million per year payment. (New Jersey Herald)
• A draft plan in Connecticut to limit the combined power generated by solar rooftops and the elimination of net metering is raising concerns about the state’s fledgling solar industry. (Hartford Courant)
• 
Solar installers say state and federal policies are holding back renewable energy development in Vermont. (Burlington Free Press)

PIPELINES:
• A city council in Pennsylvania has tabled a pipeline study after consensus could not be reached on a couple of issues. (Delaware County Daily Times)
• Developers of a natural gas pipeline in Maryland are expected to begin the next phase of the project – seeking approval from state and federal regulators, as well as residents in the path of the project. (Delmarva Now)

UTILITIES: Massachusetts state regulators are ordering utilities to cut their rates to reflect the reduction in the federal corporate tax approved by Congress. (Associated Press)

COMMENTARY:
• A newspaper editorial says the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection needs to continue to reject a pipeline project that is expected cut across various waterways and other environmentally sensitive areas. (MyCentralNewJersey.com)
• The South Jersey Times editorial board says that as New Jersey reboots the state’s wind energy program, state officials should consider resurrecting a plan for a wind turbine manufacturing hub in Paulsboro – an idea floated during the Christie administration.
• Anne Arundel County officials should exempt small solar projects from a solar moratorium so residents can receive credits on their electricity bills, says a nonprofit founder and director. (Capital Gazette)

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