OFFSHORE WIND: Federal regulators plan to begin environmental review soon for Vineyard Wind’s second offshore wind project near Massachusetts and Rhode Island. (Renewables Now)

ALSO: New Jersey’s utility developer plans to announce tomorrow the winning bids from a solicitation that may exponentially increase the state’s offshore wind generating capacity. (NJ Spotlight)

GRID:
A second Northeast heat wave causes gas and electricity prices to rise and power demand forecasts to tick up. (S&P Global)
The heat wave is breaking records in parts of New Hampshire and stressing the grid and air-conditioners. (WMUR 9)
A Vermont power cooperative asks ratepayers for evening energy conservation to curtail peak demands due to the heat. (news release)
• Long-awaited transmission projects are finally moving forward in New York, and they could prove to be a model for other states and federal transmission projects. (E&E News, subscription)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES:
Connecticut residents can now receive larger-than-ever electric vehicle purchase rebates, which now also apply to used EV purchases. (Associated Press)
Connecticut receives a $7.4 million federal grant to buy ten electric buses and ten fast chargers for use in Waterbury. (news release)
A western Massachusetts transit agency receives a $7.2 million federal grant to purchase eight new electric buses. (MassLive, subscription)

SOLAR:
Two energy companies form a joint venture to construct, own and operate more than 120 MW of community solar projects in Maine. (news release)
A western New York town passes a six-month moratorium on commercial solar farm development while it creates a law to govern the process. (Genesee Country Express)

UTILITIES:
A federally mandated transmission rate increase coupled with a rate hike sought by Central Maine Power may result in its customers paying roughly 25% more. (Portland Press Herald)
The future of Maine’s proposed utility takeover bill appears to hinge on a scheduled vote tomorrow that has at least one critical lawmaker questioning its prudence. (Bangor Daily News)

NATURAL GAS: A judge on a Pennsylvania state court recuses himself from cases involving fracking laws, as he helped create fracking legislation while working for a state senator. (TribLive)

CLIMATE: New York City launches a global competition to build a Climate Solutions Center on Governors Island, seeking universities and research institutions to anchor the center. (Brooklyn Eagle)

COMMENTARY:
New York’s abundant renewable resources can provide needed energy to New York City if effective transmission is built, the head of the Hudson Valley’s economic development group writes. (Times Union)
Four Boston-area mayors say community choice electricity programs have helped them fulfill consumer demand for more renewable energy. (MassLive)
Massachusetts clean energy advocates says ISO New England’s minimum price rules lead to overpriced clean energy resources, hindering the state’s emissions goals. (Boston Globe)
The mayor of Montpelier, Vermont, urges the state to secure federal funding to develop green infrastructure projects. (Rutland Herald)

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Kathryn Krawczyk

Kathryn brings her extensive editorial background to the Energy News Network team, where she oversees the early-morning production of ENN’s five email digest newsletters as well as distribution of ENN’s original journalism with other media outlets. From documenting chronic illness’ effect on college students to following the inner workings of Congress, Kathryn has built a broad experience in her more than five years working at major publications including The Week Magazine. Kathryn holds a Bachelor of Science in magazine journalism and information management and technology from Syracuse University.

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Bridget Reed Morawski

Bridget is a freelance reporter and newsletter writer based in the Washington, D.C., area. She compiles the Northeast Energy News digest. Bridget primarily writes about energy, conservation and the environment. Originally from Philadelphia, she graduated from Emerson College in 2015 with a degree in journalism and a minor in environmental studies. When she isn’t working on a story, she’s normally on a northern Maine lake or traveling abroad to practice her Spanish language skills.