Southeast Energy News

Young Southeast Republicans create a more modest Green New Deal

CLIMATE: A group of young Republicans in the Southeast who embrace climate change action and clean energy draft the American Climate Contract — their more modest response to the Green New Deal. (InsideClimate News)

PIPELINES:
• Alabama lawmakers advance legislation to add new criminal penalties to nonviolent protests against pipelines and other fossil fuel projects. (HuffPost)
• Enbridge shuts down three of its pipelines after an explosion and fire at a Kentucky pipeline. (Reuters)

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ELECTRIC VEHICLES: Tesla CEO Elon Musk files a lawsuit and threatens to move the company’s headquarters to Texas or Nevada after California officials tell the company it cannot reopen its factory yet because of coronavirus restrictions. (Dallas Morning News)

NUCLEAR: Dominion Energy is close to reaching a $25 million settlement with stock market regulators over the failed V.C. Summer nuclear project in South Carolina. (Post and Courier)

OIL & GAS:
• Oil and gas shipped in, refined and extracted along the Gulf Coast creates a host of social and environmental concerns for communities. (Carlsbad Current Argus)
• Texas businesses reopen during the pandemic, but the struggling oil and gas industry might hold the state’s economy back. (Texas Tribune)

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COMMENTARY:
• Two leaders from energy and conservative groups say Texas should embrace energy storage, which will allow it to be more flexible in generating, managing and consuming energy. (Energy News Network)
• The Tennessee Valley Authority pays its CEO too much, and it would be good public policy to cut his salary, a Tennessee congressman writes. (Knoxville News Sentinel)
• Virginia environmental regulators are still excluding the public and failing to provide water protections even after the Mountain Valley Pipeline caused pollution, says the director of a conservation group. (Virginia Mercury)

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