OIL & GAS: Advocates petition the U.S. EPA to take over permitting of injection wells for fracking waste, citing “longstanding and systemic failures” in state oversight. (Ohio Capital Journal)

GRID:
• Xcel Energy is seeking to expand its work on community microgrids in Minnesota, with critics saying the utility would hold an unfair advantage over other developers. (Energy News Network)
• Developers are fighting a Federal Emergency Management Association proposal to toughen construction standards for wind and solar projects to improve reliability in extreme weather, saying the new rules will kill projects. (Utility Dive)
• An Indiana task force recommends lawmakers ease barriers to new transmission and adopt time-of-use rates, but fails to address rooftop solar, efficiency and equity. (WFYI)
• A rare October tornado outbreak knocked out power to 22,000 customers in southeast Wisconsin yesterday. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

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PIPELINES:
• An Iowa county is dropped from the proposed route for a CO2 pipeline, with a local official saying he’s glad the developer “has decided to take its dog and pony show elsewhere.” (Cedar Rapids Gazette)
• An Iowa landowner being sued by CO2 pipeline developers for blocking access to her land believes the company is “going to make an example of us.” (Sioux City Journal)

HB 6 SCANDAL:
• Attorney General Dave Yost asks the Ohio Supreme Court to block a ruling that would unfreeze former regulator Sam Randazzo’s assets. (Cleveland.com)
• In a debate with election challenger Rep. Jeff Crossman, Yost defends his record on the HB 6 corruption scandal. (WOSU)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES:
• Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer is expected to be on hand today for the groundbreaking of a new battery plant that its founder says will help move the industry away from rare materials like cobalt. (Detroit Free Press)
• A planned rare minerals processing plant in North Dakota receives a $114 million federal grant. (Bismarck Tribune)

UTILITIES: Consumer and industry groups push back on AEP Ohio’s request for regulators to lower grid reliability standards. (Ideastream Public Media)

SOLAR:
• An Ohio township is seeking to block a proposed solar array, but a new law giving local governments more siting power won’t apply because it was passed after the project was initially filed. (Springfield News-Sun)
• A Missouri task force is exploring how to tax solar farms after the state Supreme Court struck down a property tax exemption in August. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

CLEAN ENERGY:
• 7-Eleven signs a deal with DTE Energy to provide 100% renewable energy to its 160 Southeast Michigan locations. (CBS Detroit)
• A Wisconsin congressman criticizes state clean energy goals, saying customers should get electricity from whoever can provide it most cheaply. (WQOW)

CLIMATE: An analysis ranks the Minnesota legislature, Michigan attorney general, Ohio Supreme Court and other races as among the most pivotal for climate policy in this year’s election. (Vox, Energy News Network)

More from the Energy News Network: Midwest | Southeast | Northeast | West

Questions or comments about this article? Contact us at editor@energynews.us.

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Ken Paulman

Ken is the director of the Energy News Network at Fresh Energy and is a founding editor of both Midwest Energy News and Southeast Energy News. Prior to joining Fresh Energy, he was the managing editor for online news at Minnesota Public Radio. He started his journalism career in 2002 as a copy editor for the Duluth News Tribune before spending five years at the Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Washington, where he worked as a copy editor, online producer, features editor and night city editor. A Nebraska native, Ken has a bachelor's degree from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and a master's degree from the University of Oregon. He is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists and Investigative Reporters and Editors.