ELECTRIC VEHICLES: As automakers slowly roll out electric vehicles, experts say improving the efficiency of gasoline-powered cars will still be essential to reducing emissions. (Vox)

ALSO:
• The global transition to electric vehicles is not happening equitably, leaving emerging economies without the benefits of better air quality and economic investments that come with EVs, analysts warn. (Axios)
• General Motors announces a price cut for its Chevrolet Bolt, making it the cheapest electric vehicle in the U.S. (CNN)
• Ford’s CEO expects more consolidation among automakers and suppliers as the transition to electric vehicles requires large capital investments. (CNBC)
• Local Georgia candidates who based their campaigns on opposition to Rivian’s planned $5 billion electric vehicle factory generally found little success in last week’s primary elections. (Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

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EQUITY:
• The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s environmental justice counsel says the agency can “absolutely” include equity in its considerations of natural gas projects. (E&E News)
• New Jersey environmental protection officials propose a policy that would require state regulators to consider the cumulative impact of pollution on surrounding communities. (NJ Spotlight)

POLITICS:
• U.S. House Republicans plan to unveil a plan today aimed at increasing all types of energy production, streamlining infrastructure permitting, and boosting natural gas exports.  (Washington Post)
• President Joe Biden’s nominees to the Tennessee Valley Authority board have been waiting more than a year for U.S. Senate confirmation at a pivotal time when the federal agency is considering dramatic changes to its electricity mix. (E&E News)

BUILDINGS: The White House announces a push to ensure America’s buildings adhere to new building codes meant to boost energy efficiency and disaster resilience in the face of climate change. (E&E News)

GRID: An energy advisory council recommends Pacific Northwest utilities acquire at least 3,500 MW of renewable power in the next five years to offset growing demand and coal plant closures. (Utility Dive)

OIL & GAS: New Mexico environmentalists say federal agencies are undercounting orphaned and abandoned oil and gas wells in the state, thereby hampering efforts to clean them up. (Source NM)

BIOMASS: A new law encouraging wood-fired combined heat and power plants in Maine is drawing praise for its potential economic and environmental benefits, but some climate activists are skeptical the program will cut carbon emissions. (Energy News Network)

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COAL ASH: The Tennessee Supreme Court questions lawyers for a company that oversaw safety during cleanup of a 2008 power plant coal ash spill as it determines whether workers who say they were sickened during the cleanup can sue. (Knoxville News-Sentinel, Associated Press)

PIPELINES: A developer seeks to repurpose 392 miles of abandoned gas pipeline to carry carbon dioxide from potential sources in Nebraska and Kansas. (S&P Global)

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Kathryn Krawczyk

Kathryn brings her extensive editorial background to the Energy News Network team, where she oversees the early-morning production of ENN’s five email digest newsletters as well as distribution of ENN’s original journalism with other media outlets. From documenting chronic illness’ effect on college students to following the inner workings of Congress, Kathryn has built a broad experience in her more than five years working at major publications including The Week Magazine. Kathryn holds a Bachelor of Science in magazine journalism and information management and technology from Syracuse University.