WIND: Avangrid will push back construction of two wind projects off the shore of Massachusetts for a year and renegotiate contracts with suppliers and power buyers, citing supply shortages and forecasting a modest price hike. (Boston Globe)

ALSO:
• A wind turbine maintenance training program in Northern Maine struggles to attract students even as the field sees major growth. (Maine Public)
• Long Island’s Offshore Wind Training Institute encourages New York state colleges to apply for $8.1 million in funding to build an industry workforce pipeline. (Newsday)
• Rhode Island officials and union leaders celebrate the Block Island Wind Farm’s completion of five years in service and contemplate the industry’s future throughout the Northeast. (Providence Business Journal, Boston Globe)
• A transmission developer building a power line on the Long Island coast wants to partner with offshore wind builders to connect clean energy to the rest of the state. (Recharge)
• New Hampshire will host an offshore wind industry summit in Portsmouth on Tuesday. (Portsmouth Herald)

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CLEAN ENERGY:
• New York launches a clean energy solicitation, seeking 2,000 MW to come online by 2028. (Utility Dive)
• Ithaca, New York’s city council agrees to seek public comment on joining a community choice aggregation program to further its emissions reduction goals. (Ithaca Voice)
• A Massachusetts city gets a first look at a proposed net zero action plan that recommends a switch to electric heating and appliances and more clean energy procurement. (Patch)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES:
• Electric vehicle rental company Revel uses bidirectional chargers to send electricity from three Nissan Leafs back to New York City’s grid during peak demand, and hopes to do the same with its 200 Teslas. (Emerging Tech Brew)
• Pennsylvania is awarded $25.4 million by the federal government to build out electric vehicle chargers. (PennLive)

SOLAR: New York approves a 120 MW solar project in the northern part of the state. (NNY360)

OIL & GAS: A New Jersey town council votes to oppose construction of a 630 MW gas-fired power plant. (CentralJersey.com)

TRANSMISSION: Developers finalize contracts with construction companies as they seek to build a transmission line to bring hydroelectric power from Québec to New York City. (HydroReview)

AFFORDABILITY:
• At a public hearing, Rhode Island residents urge the state’s utility regulators to reject a close to 47% rate hike estimated to take effect this winter. (Cranston Online)
• Massachusetts’ governor says the state and much of New England is seeking federal assistance to curb heating costs this winter. (Berkshire Eagle)
• Maryland seeks nonprofits and local governments to apply for its low-to-moderate income energy efficiency grant program. (news release)

BIOMASS:
• Massachusetts researchers explore using food waste to produce biodiesel. (The Digest)
• New Hampshire Republican leaders say they’ll introduce legislation this upcoming session to restart four defunct wood-burning power plants. (New Hampshire Bulletin)

COMMENTARY: The president of the Sierra Club calls on New York City to develop a strong climate action plan that halts construction of new fossil fuel power plants and mandates electric building construction. (City Limits)

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Kathryn Krawczyk

Kathryn brings her extensive editorial background to the Energy News Network team, where she oversees the early-morning production of ENN’s five email digest newsletters as well as distribution of ENN’s original journalism with other media outlets. From documenting chronic illness’ effect on college students to following the inner workings of Congress, Kathryn has built a broad experience in her more than five years working at major publications including The Week Magazine. Kathryn holds a Bachelor of Science in magazine journalism and information management and technology from Syracuse University.