POLITICS: President Biden says there may be “tweaks” to the Inflation Reduction Act to also extend incentives to clean energy components made by U.S. allies after European countries complained. (E&E News)

ALSO:
A top EU official backs out of next week’s U.S. trade summit, saying it doesn’t devote enough time to discuss allies’ issues with the climate law. (Bloomberg)
• As the White House struggled for two years to put a price tag on carbon emissions’ damage, the U.S. EPA quietly took the lead and published its own social cost of carbon metric last month. (E&E News)

OIL & GAS:
• After the federal government proposes funding abandoned oil and gas well cleanup, states map more than 120,000 orphaned wells, up from the 81,000 they reported last year. (Washington Post)
The Biden administration issues an oil and gas leasing strategy aiming to push companies off public land and concentrate new drilling in existing fields, angering both industry and environmentalists. (Bloomberg Law)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES:
• Automakers are increasingly expanding their portfolios to sell home solar and battery storage systems, hoping to bundle them with electric vehicle purchases. (Inside Climate News)
• Connecticut’s Ford dealers consider whether they can fulfill the manufacturer’s new requirements to sell its electric vehicles, which will cost hundreds of thousands of dollars to fulfill. (New Haven Register)
• Tesla’s new heavy duty electric Semi trucks feature a new, fast-charging system that will also be used to power the consumer pickup truck it will produce at its factory in Austin, Texas. (CNBC)

WIND: The wind industry lacks early-career opportunities like apprenticeships, posing a big gap as the U.S. looks to build a wind workforce. (Utility Dive)

GRID:
• Federal energy regulators approve a “first-ready, first-served” interconnection review process for PJM Interconnection as the grid operator digs out of its backlog; new requests won’t be reviewed until early 2026. (Utility Dive)
• Congress considers a Biden administration request to grant Puerto Rico $3 billion to install rooftop solar and battery storage to shore up its grid in case of natural disasters. (Grist)
Grid operator Southwest Power Pool publishes plans for a proposed day-ahead Western power market that would build on its existing energy imbalance market. (Utility Dive)
• Chicago utility ComEd launches a demonstration project for battery storage facilities that could provide neighborhoods with grid reliability in the event of outages. (Daily Energy Insider)

CLIMATE: Hurricane season ends, but not before two late-season storms devastated the Southeast, with Fiona further destroying Puerto Rico’s power grid and Ian causing an estimated $67 billion in private market insured losses in Florida. (New York Times, news release)

SOLAR: A solar industry lobbyist urges the federal government to open up more public lands to renewable energy projects, saying distributed generation and development on private land will not be enough. (Los Angeles Times)

COAL: The operator of Ohio’s largest coal plant plans to switch to a different coal ash waste handling method in response to a recent U.S. EPA order to stop using an on-site coal ash pond. (Energy News Network)

COMMENTARY: Utilities shouldn’t delay their planning for the electrification of long-haul trucks, as getting electricity to far-flung locations will require a lot of work in the coming years, a consultant writes. (Utility Dive)

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Kathryn Krawczyk

Kathryn brings her extensive editorial background to the Energy News Network team, where she oversees the early-morning production of ENN’s five email digest newsletters as well as distribution of ENN’s original journalism with other media outlets. From documenting chronic illness’ effect on college students to following the inner workings of Congress, Kathryn has built a broad experience in her more than five years working at major publications including The Week Magazine. Kathryn holds a Bachelor of Science in magazine journalism and information management and technology from Syracuse University.