OIL & GAS: A federal court orders the federal government to complete a full environmental impact statement before permitting hydraulic fracturing off the California coast, saying existing analyses are inadequate. (Los Angeles Times)

ALSO:
The Wyoming oil and gas industry protests an upcoming federal lease sale because too little land is being offered, and environmental groups protest for the opposite reason. (Pinedale Roundup)
Only one company bids for state-owned parcels in the Cook Inlet at an Alaska oil and gas lease auction, while a sale elsewhere in the state receives no bids. (Alaska Public Media) 

SOLAR:
• The Biden administration is expected to declare a 24-month tariff exemption for solar panels from four Asian nations to spur the industry to restart development it put on hold due to a federal solar import probe. (Reuters)
• The federal Bureau of Land Management gives low-priority permitting status to three proposed solar developments near Death Valley National Park after environmentalists raised concerns. (E&E News, subscription)
Federal regulators order Tri-State Generation & Transmission to amend a community solar rate policy that imposed an extra charge on members who didn’t adopt specific community solar projects. (BizWest Media)
A New Mexico electricity cooperative brings a new solar array online, allowing it to meet 100% of its daytime load with solar power. (news release)

GRID: Arizona’s head utility regulator says the state’s power grids are prepared for heat-related demands. (KTAR) 

TRANSPORTATION: Arizona transportation officials plan to use federal funds to install new electric vehicle charging infrastructure along interstate highways. (12 News)

UTILITIES:
A southern California community choice aggregator program is thrown into turmoil by a whistleblower complaint and doubts about its commitment to renewable energy. (Los Angeles Times)
Hawaiian Electric expands a pilot program that pays rooftop solar customers to add battery storage. (Hawaii Public Radio)

HYDROGEN: A southern Wyoming county rejects a proposal to construct a wind-powered green hydrogen production plant. (Rawlins Times)  

COAL:
Montana coal production increased 11% in March from the year before as rising natural gas prices make the fuel more competitive. (Billings Gazette)
A Wyoming company seeks federal approval to revive an abandoned northern California rail line to carry Powder River Basin coal for export. (Press Democrat) 

CRYPTOCURRENCY: A bitcoin mining company plans to build a 50 MW data center in Montana powered by Salish-Kootenai Dam hydroelectricity. (Missoulian)

COMMENTARY: A California professor says the state must site utility-scale solar projects on degraded lands and fund rooftop solar equitably to meet climate and conservation goals. (Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists)

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Jonathan P. Thompson

Jonathan hails from southwestern Colorado and has been writing about the land, cultures, and communities of the Western United States for more than two decades. He compiles the Western Energy News digest. He is the author of three books, a contributing editor at High Country News, and the editor of the Land Desk, an e-newsletter that provides coverage and context on issues critical to the West.