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BUILDINGS: The city council of Washington, D.C., votes to strengthen its building electrification and energy efficiency standards, leaving the mayor and Congress to authorize the legislation. (Bloomberg Law)

HYDROPOWER: A federal appeals court vacates a federal license issued last year to Maryland’s Conowingo Dam, a move the facility’s operator says threatens the state’s largest renewable energy resource. (Salisbury Daily Times)

GRID:
• An energy infrastructure company plans to bring a 200 MW battery to an Eversource substation in Connecticut. (CT Insider)
• An American Clean Power Association-commissioned study finds that incremental renewable energy development in northern Maine would help lower energy market prices across ISO-New England. (Solar Industry)

SOLAR:
• Maine’s Versant Power tells some homeowners they cannot install solar panels because their local grid capacity is flooded with net metering customers. (Ellsworth American)
• New Jersey solar developers behind 199 projects under development for over a year ask state regulators to let them have more time to finish construction and still qualify for state incentives. (NJ Spotlight)
• In New Hampshire, a Christmas tree farm will be completely powered by solar energy starting next year. (news release)

OFFSHORE WIND:
• Massachusetts grants $180 million to New Bedford, Salem and Somerset to shore up the businesses and infrastructure that will support offshore wind. (CommonWealth Magazine)
• Observers question whether the Mayflower Wind project, which appears to have more regulatory hurdles to cross, will follow Commonwealth Wind in sticking to the terms of its original agreement. (CommonWealth Magazine)
• A New Jersey state senator wants to tap the brakes on offshore wind development plans, pointing to a state agency’s recent research about development costs and subsequent customer bill impacts. (ROI NJ)

OIL & GAS:
• A Shell executive’s now-public emails show concern within the company about the environmental impact of a huge ethane cracker plant near Pittsburgh. (Inside Climate News)
• Baltimore’s legal team asks the U.S. Supreme Court to reject a request from several oil majors to prevent a climate harm lawsuit from being tried in state court. (Reuters)
• New York’s governor won’t say whether she’ll extend the state’s gas tax holiday into the new year. (LoHud.com)

AFFORDABILITY:
• Delmarva Power makes its largest rate hike request in its history: a $72.3 million electric distribution rate increase. (WHYY)
• Maine utility regulators reject a proposal to give a one-time, $75 utility bill credit to Central Maine Power and Versant Power’s low-income customers. (Portland Press Herald)
• Rhode Island Energy customers will receive money back in the coming months as state regulators approve reimbursing ratepayers for unused energy efficiency plan funds. (PBN)

CLIMATE:
• In Connecticut, a panel of bird advocates discusses how the American Oystercatcher is threatened by climate change and habitat loss. (CPR)
• A climate tech start-up will launch in New Haven, Connecticut, with the help of federal incubator funds in early 2023. (New Haven Independent)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES:
• Three New York City council members want the local parks department to let e-bikes into Prospect Park to increase citywide accessibility. (Streetsblog)
• In New York, Long Island lawmakers approve about $5.38 million to buy 12 battery-powered public buses. (Newsday)

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Bridget Reed Morawski

Bridget is a freelance reporter and newsletter writer based in the Washington, D.C., area. She compiles the Northeast Energy News digest. Bridget primarily writes about energy, conservation and the environment. Originally from Philadelphia, she graduated from Emerson College in 2015 with a degree in journalism and a minor in environmental studies. When she isn’t working on a story, she’s normally on a northern Maine lake or traveling abroad to practice her Spanish language skills.