SOLAR: The Biden administration prepares to announce a program that will connect recipients of federal energy cost subsidies with community solar projects that could lower their bills. (Politico)

CLEAN ENERGY: Installations of clean energy projects dropped 55% from April to June compared to the same time last year, partially due to supply chain issues and a lack of congressional support. (Reuters)

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OIL & GAS:
• The U.S. has become the world’s biggest liquefied natural gas exporter as Europe seeks alternatives to Russian fuel. (Utility Dive)
• The U.S. EPA prepares to unveil a rule regulating oil and gas methane emissions, and legal experts say it falls within the scope of regulatory approaches the Supreme Court left standing. (E&E News)
Natural gas prices surge amid high temperatures, even as the temporary closure of an export facility due to a fire has stranded more gas in the domestic market. (Bloomberg)
• Oil field employment hasn’t recovered since its pandemic slump, even as the oil industry itself resumes production and regains profits. (E&E News)

CLIMATE:
• The Biden administration launches heat.gov, a website that includes forecasts and tips meant to help municipalities prepare for extreme heat. (New York Times)
• Ministers and faith leaders across the Southeast increasingly advocate for mobilizing against climate change as a Christian duty, re-framing the climate crisis as a values-based issue rather than a political one. (Guardian)

COAL: Sen. Joe Manchin’s rejection of Democrats’ climate bill dashes coal miners’ hopes that the measure would include increased payouts for those suffering black lung disease. (E&E News)

HYDROGEN: Nuclear and hydrogen industry interests form a coalition to work more closely on producing clean hydrogen. (E&E News)

OFFSHORE WIND: Developers are unearthing unexploded World War II munitions as they look to build wind farms off the New England coast. (E&E News)

EMISSIONS: More than 175 environmental organizations urge the U.S. Transportation Department to require cities and states to set emissions standards. (The Hill)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES:
Uber announces it will expand its all-electric fleet to seven more cities. (Axios)
A federal investigation finds evidence of pervasive racial discrimination at Tesla’s San Francisco factory. (Bloomberg Law)

EFFICIENCY: New research by Efficiency Maine shows that stand-alone heat pump systems can deliver comfort and cost savings even in sub-zero temperatures. (Energy News Network)

STORAGE: A Maryland company touts its new solid-state battery, which it says lacks overheating and flammability concerns sometimes observed in lithium-ion models. (Daily Record)

NUCLEAR: Environmental groups sue to reverse a federal license granted to an interim spent nuclear reactor fuel depository proposed for the Permian Basin. (Carlsbad Current-Argus)

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Kathryn Krawczyk

Kathryn brings her extensive editorial background to the Energy News Network team, where she oversees the early-morning production of ENN’s five email digest newsletters as well as distribution of ENN’s original journalism with other media outlets. From documenting chronic illness’ effect on college students to following the inner workings of Congress, Kathryn has built a broad experience in her more than five years working at major publications including The Week Magazine. Kathryn holds a Bachelor of Science in magazine journalism and information management and technology from Syracuse University.