SOLAR: The North Carolina Supreme Court rules against a Raleigh homeowners association and says a resident can keep his rooftop solar panels, potentially opening the door for solar at thousands of planned developments across the state. (Energy News Network)

GRID:
Power demand on the Texas grid reached a new high of 76,600 MW Monday, breaking a record set last week. (Fox Business)
• Entergy officials project the highest energy use in company history this week for a territory that includes Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas. (WBRZ)
• Changes in Texas grid rules to shift pricing and procure more power after last year’s winter storm have cost the state between $685 million to $860 million in the first five months of this year. (Austin American-Statesman)
• High winds topple trees and result in 28,000 power outages in North Carolina. (Winston-Salem Journal)

WIND:
• Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards signs a new law to create a framework that will allow offshore wind leasing, but some industry advocates oppose a provision that lets the state take a cut of wind farm revenues while also charging for leases. (NOLA.com)
• A shipping and energy tycoon purchases a Florida shipyard known for its aluminum and steel vessels as companies look for more work boats to build offshore wind facilities. (Recharge) 

ELECTRIC VEHICLES:
• Ford officials pledge to be good neighbors as they gear up to build a $5.6 billion factory to make electric trucks in Tennessee. (WATN, Associated Press)
• North Carolina selects four coastal towns to receive money from the Volkswagen settlement to install electric vehicle chargers. (Coastal Review)
• A lithium mining company that proposed a North Carolina mine takes steps to secure supplies in other countries due to opposition and uncertainty about its U.S. plans. (Reuters)

NUCLEAR: Two power companies with a majority share in nuclear Plant Vogtle sue Georgia Power over a contract change involving cost overruns in construction of two new reactor units. (Associated Press)

COAL: A water quality group says it will sue a coal company that’s been the subject of a long-running miners’ strike for discharging pollution into west Alabama creeks. (Patch)

OVERSIGHT: Federal regulators say they’re moving to speed up consideration of energy generation and storage projects as they face a backlog of more than more than 1,400 GW. (Houston Chronicle)

EFFICIENCY: West Virginia’s congressional delegation hesitates to back legislation to expedite production of heat pumps, which proponents say would increase access to affordable energy and cut fossil fuel emissions. (Charleston Gazette-Mail)

EMISSIONS: Environmentalists call for a citizen air board to keep Virginia in an 11-state carbon market intended to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. (Augusta Free Press)

TRANSITION: Climate and labor activists rally in West Virginia for a congressional budget bill that would fund climate change and coal transition initiatives. (Times West Virginian)

COMMENTARY:
• An activist calls on Appalachian Trail hikers to oppose the Mountain Valley Pipeline. (The Trek)
• An energy activist calls for a Virginia city’s natural gas utility to develop a decarbonization plan. (Daily Progress)

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Mason Adams

Mason has worked as a journalist since 2001, covering Appalachian communities and the issues that affect them. He compiles the Southeast Energy News digest. Mason previously worked as a wildlife biologist before moving into journalism by freelancing at Coast Weekly in Monterey, California, before taking an internship in 2001 at High Country News. He wrote for the Enterprise Mountaineer in western North Carolina and the Roanoke Times in western Virginia before going freelance in 2012. His work has appeared in Southerly, Daily Yonder, Mother Jones, Huffington Post, WVPB’s Inside Appalachia and elsewhere. Mason was born and raised in Clifton Forge, Virginia, and now lives with his family and a small herd of goats in Floyd County, Virginia.