POLITICS: A New York Times investigation identifies nearly 100 federal legislators whose family investment activity intersected with their committee assignments — including at least five from the Northeast whose trades concerned energy or electric vehicle stocks. (New York Times)

ALSO:
In New Hampshire, local analysts say Republican lawmakers are increasingly focusing on climate mitigation solutions rather than dismissing the problem. (New Hampshire Bulletin)
Even if Pennsylvania’s entrance into the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative survives the state courts, November’s gubernatorial election might bring in a Republican who would cut off participation. (Bloomberg Government)

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CLIMATE:
A new study finds sea level rise could inundate over 6,000 homes along the New Jersey coast at high tide by 2050. (Philadelphia Inquirer, subscription)
New data shows that roughly 83% of major power outages in Maine from 2000 to 2021 are attributable to weather events. (Bangor Daily News)
President Joe Biden’s vacation home in the Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, area is among those most at risk from rising sea levels in the low-lying state, with projections suggesting the area will face “extreme” flood exposure. (CNN)

GEOTHERMAL: Construction is underway on what is slated to be New York City’s largest geothermal heating and cooling system, which will service a large residential complex in the Brooklyn borough. (ENR New York)

CLEAN ENERGY:
New York rural electric co-ops cheer new tax reforms that allow them to take advantage of incentives for renewable energy development. (Times Union)
A northern Maine panel gathers to discuss how infrastructure issues in the region make it difficult for local ratepayers to take advantage of cheaper power from renewable energy sources. (Bangor Daily News)

EFFICIENCY:
A New York City startup aims to help buildings replace aging oil heating infrastructure with electrified equipment and reduce their emissions. (New York Times)
A Cape Cod, Massachusetts, school board votes to prioritize energy efficiency programs at several buildings over conducting a roof repair at a middle school. (Cape Cod Times)

SOLAR:
New York’s grid operator proposes a minimum generation threshold that individual distributed energy resources would need to meet to participate in aggregations to speed up approvals. (RTO Insider, subscription)
A New Jersey college installs solar-powered outdoor tables that can also charge devices, quickly turning them into a popular meet-up spot. (ROI NJ)

TRANSPORTATION:
An imminent railroad worker strike may impede commuter travel between Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, as well as numerous other locations throughout Maryland’s regional train network. (WBAL)
A tech company in Cambridge, Massachusetts, releases an app that aims to save customers gas money by helping them drive more efficiently. (Boston Globe)

HYDROELECTRIC: Maine’s governor and her Republican opponent in this fall’s gubernatorial election disagree on how a potential closure of the Shawmut Dam would impact the local area. (News Center Maine)

AFFORDABILITY: A New York utility’s power supply rates rise for the third time in as many months; the company said it’s partially due to increased use of gas-fired electricity after a nearby nuclear plant closed. (Daily Freeman)

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Bridget Reed Morawski

Bridget is a freelance reporter and newsletter writer based in the Washington, D.C., area. She compiles the Northeast Energy News digest. Bridget primarily writes about energy, conservation and the environment. Originally from Philadelphia, she graduated from Emerson College in 2015 with a degree in journalism and a minor in environmental studies. When she isn’t working on a story, she’s normally on a northern Maine lake or traveling abroad to practice her Spanish language skills.