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GRID: Meteorologists say“one of the most intense storm systems in decades” is poised to hit the Great Lakes region tomorrow; the storm also has utilities in Connecticut, Massachusetts and New Hampshire on alert for power outages ahead of the Christmas holiday. (Syracuse.com, Hartford Courant, Boston.com, WMUR)

ALSO: Two environmental organizations appeal a recent Massachusetts decision to let developers of an East Boston substation skip permitting. (East Boston Times-Free Press)

CLIMATE:
• New Jersey sues a beach town to prevent development of a metal bulkhead that would protect its dunes from further coastal erosion and rising seawater, a plan rejected by state officials who want the town to wait for a long-delayed federal dune project. (Time Magazine)
• New Jersey legislators consider two bills that would help schools compost and edit food labeling standards to reduce food waste, a major source of greenhouse gasses. (New Jersey Monitor)
• A Christmas tree farm in Massachusetts recounts how all its trees died this summer amid drought, a problem seen across the country. (Boston Globe)
• In New York, a loon conservation program records its first rescue of the season — a vital effort as climate change tinkers with the birds’ seasonal instincts, leaving them iced into lakes. (NNY360)
• A Maine business accelerator program’s latest cohort includes a closed-loop composting analytics company and a carbon-sequestering prefabricated buildings manufacturer. (news release)

TRANSIT:
• The city council of Washington, D.C., passes a free public bus proposal, a measure awaiting a signature from the mayor, who is skeptical of program funding. (DCist)
• Hundreds of millions of dollars in federal funds will go toward making public transit systems more accessible for those with disabilities or mobility needs in several Northeast states. (SmartCities)

CLEAN ENERGY: Massachusetts releases a new clean energy and climate report analyzing what the state needs to do to equitably achieve net-zero emissions by 2050. (Boston Globe)

SOLAR:
• A New York town’s board rejects new solar siting regulations for both utility-scale and home installations during a contentious meeting. (Observer)
• Upstate New York farmers question whether to lease their land for solar development, predicting it will grow financially unsound to keep farming. (Daily Star)
• A northern New York county installs solar-powered bus shelters at six locations. (NNY360)
• A Philadelphia-area county replaces a shopping center’s parking meters with solar-powered payment kiosks. (Daily Times)

WIND: A Delaware county puts a moratorium on new utility-scale wind farms after concern arose about a potential wind farm proposal in Dover. (DPM)

BIOMASS: A Fort Drum, New York, biomass facility plans to close in March 2023 if the state utility commission doesn’t begin considering the power source to be renewable. (WWNY)

NUCLEAR: With a federal nuclear waste depository a long ways away, officials in one Connecticut town consider what to do with waste that was supposed to be temporarily sited there. (WSHU)

UTILITIES: A new decision from New Hampshire regulators should reallow those enrolled in a utility service shut-off trial project to switch electricity providers. (NHPR)

AFFORDABILITY: A new heating and power payment assistance program in New Hampshire hasn’t yet issued payments despite wintry conditions already underway. (New Hampshire Bulletin)

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Bridget Reed Morawski

Bridget is a freelance reporter and newsletter writer based in the Washington, D.C., area. She compiles the Northeast Energy News digest. Bridget primarily writes about energy, conservation and the environment. Originally from Philadelphia, she graduated from Emerson College in 2015 with a degree in journalism and a minor in environmental studies. When she isn’t working on a story, she’s normally on a northern Maine lake or traveling abroad to practice her Spanish language skills.