OIL & GAS: Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf and top Pennsylvania lawmakers are working on a proposed economic development deal that could direct millions of dollars annually toward natural gas and hydrogen production. (Spotlight PA)

ALSO:
• New Hampshire’s heating fuel reserves hover around 60% of their five-year average level despite a federal warning to stock up, though the state says inventories should rise as winter approaches. (New Hampshire Bulletin)
• Connecticut residents, particularly those on fixed incomes, try to cut back on other expenses as home heating oil prices rise astronomically. (The Day)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES:
• Washington, D.C., plans to create an on-demand electric shuttle service to encourage more people to get to a popular waterfront area without driving. (NBC Washington)
• Tesla wants to open its first Vermont dealership on a South Burlington lot that formerly hosted a grocery store, but the car company needs a zoning change to do so. (Seven Days)
• A large logistics business park in northern Maryland that officials say could create roughly 1,500 jobs will include electric vehicle charging stations. (Daily Record)

BUILDINGS: A massive oceanside parking lot along New York’s Long Island coast has been converted into a sustainable nature center that produces as much energy as it consumes. (dezeen)

GRID:
• A number of renewable energy developers and investors tell federal energy regulators that PJM Interconnection hasn’t sufficiently explained its proposed interconnection queue restructuring. (RTO Insider, subscription)
• A locally focused Massachusetts climate group joins an ISO-New England stakeholder organization — the New England Power Pool — to secure more climate mitigation victories at the regional level. (RTO Insider, subscription)

FLOODING:
• While communities across the Northeast have adopted successful stormwater utility programs, New Jersey municipalities are reluctant to do so because they don’t want to form more revenue-raising agencies. (NJ Spotlight)
• A key train tunnel that leads into New York City is just as vulnerable to flooding as it was during Hurricane Sandy, but a $16 million plan to make related repairs won’t wrap up until 2038. (Gothamist)
• A New York City museum reopens a year after major flooding associated with Hurricane Ida inundated its site; the rebuild incorporates climate mitigation strategies and an interactive electricity exhibit. (QNS)

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Bridget Reed Morawski

Bridget is a freelance reporter and newsletter writer based in the Washington, D.C., area. She compiles the Northeast Energy News digest. Bridget primarily writes about energy, conservation and the environment. Originally from Philadelphia, she graduated from Emerson College in 2015 with a degree in journalism and a minor in environmental studies. When she isn’t working on a story, she’s normally on a northern Maine lake or traveling abroad to practice her Spanish language skills.