CLEAN ENERGY: A FEMA proposal that would require new renewable energy installations to withstand stronger storms threatens clean energy’s growth, advocates say. (E&E News)

ALSO:
• Clean power procurement by federal agencies is at or near its lowest levels since 2010 despite strong incentives for clean energy investments. (E&E News)
• The Inflation Reduction Act could ease tensions between labor and environmental advocates by requiring developers to employ union members to build federally supported solar and wind projects. (Capital & Main)

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UTILITIES:
• Consumer and clean energy advocates say federal rules widely adopted in the 1970s that allow utilities to pass fuel costs on to customers remove incentives to transition to clean energy. (Energy News Network)
• North Carolina regulators consider whether to approve or modify Duke Energy’s decarbonization plan after a month of hearings in which opponents criticized the plan’s slow pace and reliance on natural gas. (WUNC)

POLITICS: Major environmental groups announce a joint get-out-the-vote effort to mobilize voters for climate-conscious candidates. (The Hill)

CLIMATE:
• Climate advocates hope the Biden administration will take their side in a Supreme Court case that could determine whether oil and gas companies can be held liable for climate damages. (E&E News)
• Hurricane Ian marks another climate disaster with damages totaling over $1 billion, bringing the U.S. to more than 10 so far this year. (The Hill)
• Climate change is leading to heavier rains across the U.S., as warmer temperatures allow the air to hold more water, a study finds. (Washington Post)

GRID:
• Sunrun announces that it used a virtual power plant consisting of residential solar and battery storage systems to power New England homes throughout the summer months — the first regional market to do so. (E&E News)
Florida’s rapid restoration of power to more than 2 million people after Hurricane Ian shows resilience built by 15 years of grid hardening investments. (Christian Science Monitor)
• Wyoming researchers receive $500,000 in federal funds to explore using machine learning to optimize energy storage systems connected to wind and solar power installations. (Casper Star-Tribune)

OIL & GAS: In Pennsylvania, a gas utility says a nonfunctioning heating unit and a blocked ventilation system at a daycare sent over 30 people — mostly children — to the hospital for carbon monoxide poisoning. (ABC News, Morning Call)

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ELECTRIFICATION: A northern California public power provider says its new all-electric headquarters with a solar-powered microgrid demonstrates the feasibility and practicality of zero-emissions buildings. (Building Design + Construction)

COMMENTARY: Electrification experts call on Congress to establish transmission support standards to compel neighboring grids to share power when they need it most. (Utility Dive)

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Kathryn Krawczyk

Kathryn brings her extensive editorial background to the Energy News Network team, where she oversees the early-morning production of ENN’s five email digest newsletters as well as distribution of ENN’s original journalism with other media outlets. From documenting chronic illness’ effect on college students to following the inner workings of Congress, Kathryn has built a broad experience in her more than five years working at major publications including The Week Magazine. Kathryn holds a Bachelor of Science in magazine journalism and information management and technology from Syracuse University.