SOLAR: The small solar company that initiated the federal government’s solar imports probe relied at least in part on a misinterpretation of solar manufacturing data, researchers say. (Canary Media)

ALSO: A bipartisan group of 19 governors call on the Biden administration to quickly conclude its investigation into Asian solar panel imports. (The Hill)

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EMISSIONS:
• Poor air quality, unsanitary water and chemical pollution were responsible for 1 in 6 deaths worldwide in 2015, with half of those attributed to air pollution and most happening in low- and middle-income countries, a study finds. (Washington Post)
• Researchers unveil a “Lives Saved Calculator” that models the deaths and adaptation costs that can be avoided if emissions reductions and clean energy deployment targets are met. (Axios)
• Carbon credits often overstate their promised emissions reductions and distract from more meaningful climate action, experts warn. (New York Times)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES:
• Uber adds an electric vehicle charging map to its driver app and will offer a $1-per-trip incentive for EV drivers as it pushes drivers to switch from gasoline-powered cars. (Utility Dive)
• Waste industry leaders say skyrocketing diesel prices will likely push them to electrify garbage and recycling trucks sooner than previously thought. (Utility Dive)

COAL:
• Sen. Joe Manchin resists the Biden administration’s climate actions because he fears his coal-reliant home state will suffer under a quick clean energy transition, people close to him say. (Washington Post)
• PJM Interconnection wants the only remaining coal unit in Delaware to remain online through 2026. (Delaware Business Now)

OIL & GAS: Legal experts say the Biden administration’s approach of offering selective oil and gas leases could be more defensible in court than an outright drilling ban. (E&E News)

UTILITIES: Climate activists criticize Duke Energy for relying too much on natural gas in its newly proposed “Carbon Plan,” whose four pathways to emission reductions all include over 3 GW of new natural gas plants and lack preparation for offshore wind growth. (Energy News Network)

STORAGE: The Department of Energy launches a $505 million initiative meant to boost development of small- and large-scale energy storage. (Utility Dive)

GRID:
• Texas officials credit power reserves, a directive urging generators to keep plants online, and conservation for preventing the grid from slipping into emergency conditions on Friday. (Houston Chronicle)
• Grid operator MISO expects an increased probability of rolling blackouts this summer as hot weather drives up electricity demand and supplies tighten. (Star Tribune)

EFFICIENCY: A study finds including predicted gas and electricity costs in rental listings would make Americans more likely to rent a more energy efficiency apartment. (Grist)

WIND: An Indiana county’s rejection of wind development despite rare offers from a developer highlights challenges ahead for adding wind capacity in the Midwest. (E&E News)

BIOGAS: Installing biodigesters that convert cow manure and food waste into natural gas could help keep struggling dairy farms afloat, despite their high installation and repair costs. (Modern Farmer)

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Kathryn Krawczyk

Kathryn brings her extensive editorial background to the Energy News Network team, where she oversees the early-morning production of ENN’s five email digest newsletters as well as distribution of ENN’s original journalism with other media outlets. From documenting chronic illness’ effect on college students to following the inner workings of Congress, Kathryn has built a broad experience in her more than five years working at major publications including The Week Magazine. Kathryn holds a Bachelor of Science in magazine journalism and information management and technology from Syracuse University.