U.S. Energy News is one of five regional services published by the Energy News Network. Today’s edition was compiled by Kathryn Krawczyk.

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Editor’s note: Some readers in other regions were mistakenly sent this morning’s edition of Southeast Energy News. We apologize for the additional email.

MINERALS: The Biden administration and key allies launch a critical mineral security program as automakers search for ways to secure electric vehicle battery materials amid geopolitical supply chain disruptions. (Inside Climate News)

ALSO:
• Environmentalists worry a push to use the Defense Production Act to boost production of minerals needed to build out clean energy will harm tribal lands and frontline communities. (E&E News)
• Federal and state officials say a lithium battery startup that plans to open a West Virginia factory may pave a path for the state through the energy transition. (Charleston Gazette-Mail)

EQUITY: Clean energy installations have so far been disproportionately confined to wealthy countries, even though poorer areas often have a higher potential of harnessing solar and wind power. (Bloomberg)

POLITICS:
• The Biden administration’s proposed 2023 budget appears to leave out major climate spending in favor of appealing to moderate lawmakers. (Bloomberg)
• U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin has consistently acted to help a West Virginia power plant that is the only customer of his family’s coal business, including at the expense of ambitious federal climate legislation. (New York Times)
• Democrats’ narrow hold on the U.S. Senate puts Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Chair Richard Glick’s job at risk when his term expires this summer. (Politico)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES: The U.S. Postal Service increases its order of electric trucks to 10,000, though most of its new fleet will still rely on gasoline. (Canary Media)

WIND: The federal government announces it will auction off wind power tracts in two areas off the North Carolina and South Carolina shores. (Associated Press)

GRID:
The U.S. installed a record 3 GW of grid-scale storage last year, nearly tripling 2020’s installation totals. (Utility Dive)
• A federal regulator calls on grid operators to change the way interconnection queues are processed in order to speed up inter-regional transmission projects. (Utility Dive)

PIPELINES: The federal government and the Dakota Access pipeline developer misled the public, used substandard science and failed to cooperate with tribes while the project was built, according to a new report from an Indigenous nonprofit. (Grist)

OIL & GAS:
Connecticut utility regulators want to end a program that incentivizes homeowners and businesses to convert from oil to natural gas as soon as April. (Energy News Network)
• Efforts to ramp up liquified natural gas exports from Louisiana will likely be slowed by lengthy construction timelines, maxed-out capacities, regulatory pressures and environmental opposition. (The Advocate)
• The Biden administration’s push to increase natural gas exports to Europe gives a boost to a controversial $38 billion Alaska LNG export terminal and pipeline project proposal. (Fairbanks Daily News-Miner) 

NUCLEAR: Indigenous and environmental advocates say proposals to ban Russian uranium imports and revive the domestic mining industry pose environmental and spiritual threats to tribal nations. (Guardian) 

UTILITIES: Customer revenue from a FirstEnergy subsidiary in 2017 secretly flowed to a dark money nonprofit group supporting former President Trump’s energy agenda at the time, records show. (E&E News)

SOLAR: La Crosse, Wisconsin finds a workaround to the state’s third-party owned solar uncertainty, partnering with Johnson Controls on an energy performance savings contract that includes on-site solar. (Energy News Network)

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Kathryn Krawczyk

Kathryn brings her extensive editorial background to the Energy News Network team, where she oversees the early-morning production of ENN’s five email digest newsletters as well as distribution of ENN’s original journalism with other media outlets. From documenting chronic illness’ effect on college students to following the inner workings of Congress, Kathryn has built a broad experience in her more than five years working at major publications including The Week Magazine. Kathryn holds a Bachelor of Science in magazine journalism and information management and technology from Syracuse University.