CLIMATE: The United States and China resume formal climate talks after the latter suspended negotiations in August following House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s Taiwan visit. (Washington Post)

COP27:
• Democrats at the climate conference attempt to explain why they dropped proposed foreign climate aid from the Inflation Reduction Act. (E&E News)
• A draft agreement COP27 attendees will debate and revise through the rest of the conference includes funding for vulnerable countries facing climate “loss and damages.” (The Hill)
• As the U.S. heads a panel discussion on global deforestation, a report shows federal agencies are considering several logging projects, including in carbon-capturing, old-growth forests. (Guardian)

RELIABILITY:
• In “a sobering assessment,” the North American Electric Reliability Corporation predicts the Midwest, New England and Southeast face high power reliability risks this winter. (Utility Dive)
• The U.S. clean energy and storage sectors are likely to avoid proposed code changes that would’ve forced developers to build them to withstand more intense weather. (Utility Dive)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES:
• U.S. and European startups are racing to develop electric vehicle batteries made with more abundant sodium and sulfur that could reduce China’s dominance in the sector. (Reuters)
• U.S. electric vehicle registrations increased during the first nine months of the year by 57% compared to the same period last year as more models are available. (Smart Cities Dive)
• A Korean car parts company will expand in Georgia to support Hyundai’s planned factories there, launching an expected wave of electric vehicle parts suppliers locating in the area. (GlobalAtlanta)

WIND: Rising interest rates, supply chain shortages and inflation threaten U.S. offshore wind goals after developers paid sky-high rates for contracts that didn’t take higher costs into account. (E&E News)

EFFICIENCY: The Biden administration begins accepting applications for $250 million for energy efficiency upgrades. (The Hill)

OIL & GAS:
A peer-reviewed study finds fossil fuel-funded energy research centers’ reports are “more favorable” toward natural gas than renewable energy. (Gizmodo)
Federal energy analysts say Permian Basin oil production is rising more slowly than expected but predict output will reach another record high in December. (Reuters) 

SOLAR:
• Virginia regulators consider changing stormwater rules to treat ground-mounted solar installations like parking lots, which solar proponents say would dramatically increase costs and potentially disrupt clean energy deployment. (Energy News Network)
• Companies that developed solar farms in three states agree to pay a total of $1.3 million in state and federal penalties for violating construction permits and rules for handling groundwater. (Associated Press) 

BUILDINGS: In Montpelier, Vermont, city officials and real estate agents say most home sellers are complying with a recent ordinance requiring them to provide an energy cost summary of their properties and note savings opportunities. (Energy News Network)

COMMENTARY: Dozens of international news organizations call for a windfall tax on fossil fuel companies that would be used to fund climate reparations. (Guardian)

More from the Energy News Network: Midwest | Southeast | Northeast | West
View this campaign in your browser.

Questions or comments about this article? Contact us at editor@energynews.us.

Avatar photo

Kathryn Krawczyk

Kathryn brings her extensive editorial background to the Energy News Network team, where she oversees the early-morning production of ENN’s five email digest newsletters as well as distribution of ENN’s original journalism with other media outlets. From documenting chronic illness’ effect on college students to following the inner workings of Congress, Kathryn has built a broad experience in her more than five years working at major publications including The Week Magazine. Kathryn holds a Bachelor of Science in magazine journalism and information management and technology from Syracuse University.