China berates U.S. ‘retrogression on climate change’

CLIMATE: In an escalating back-and-forth series of diplomatic barbs, China criticizes the United States as a “consensus-breaker and a troublemaker” that is undermining global climate action. (Washington Post)

ALSO:
• While California hit its 2020 climate target four years early, a new report finds emissions increased slightly in 2018, highlighting the challenge of deeper reductions in the future. (Los Angeles Times)
• Scientists predicted that megafires like the ones hitting California this year would be a consequence of climate change, but they arrived decades earlier than expected. (E&E News, subscription required)
• A Michigan pilot program to sell carbon offsets based on state forest conservation faces skepticism from environmental justice advocates who worry the credits will be used to prolong pollution from fossil fuel power plants. (Energy News Network)

***SPONSORED LINK: The University of Minnesota Law, Policy, and Business Conference on Equity and Electrification of Transportation, Friday, October 23, from 10 am – 2:30 pm, will discuss broader reforms to our transportation systems through the lens of law, policy, and business.

As states expand electric vehicle charging, who should pay?

ELECTRIC VEHICLES: Multiple states are grappling with the role utilities should have in developing electric vehicle charging infrastructure. (Wall Street Journal)

ALSO:
• General Motors rebrands a Detroit auto factory to reflect growth in electric vehicle production. (Detroit News)
• New Jersey’s road map for clean energy conversion calls for 100% of new cars sold to be electric by 2035. (E&E News, subscription required)

***SPONSORED LINK: The University of Minnesota Law, Policy, and Business Conference on Equity and Electrification of Transportation, Friday, October 23, from 10 am – 2:30 pm, will discuss broader reforms to our transportation systems through the lens of law, policy, and business. Register here.

In bipartisan moment, FERC opens door to carbon pricing

POLICY: The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission says it will consider grid operators’ requests for carbon pricing, a rare moment of bipartisan cooperation on climate policy. (E&E News)

SUPREME COURT:
• Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett’s responses on climate change have generated controversy because they align with language frequently used by politicians who oppose regulating emissions. (New York Times)
• Judges have often acknowledged the reality of climate change, including recently appointed Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who said in 2016 that there is a “moral imperative” to address the crisis. (E&E News, subscription)

***SPONSORED LINK: The University of Minnesota Law, Policy, and Business Conference on Equity and Electrification of Transportation, Friday, October 23, from 10 am – 2:30 pm, will discuss broader reforms to our transportation systems through the lens of law, policy, and business. Register here.

Amy Coney Barrett still won’t comment on climate change

CLIMATE: As Senate hearings continue, Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett continues to evade questions on climate change, saying she will not state a view on a “politically controversial” subject. (Associated Press)

ALSO:
• Scientists say this year saw the hottest September on record, at nearly 1.75 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th century average. (Associated Press)
• Hundreds of law students pledge to boycott one of the country’s most prestigious law firms over its representation of oil companies. (E&E News, subscription)

***SPONSORED LINK: The University of Minnesota Law, Policy, and Business Conference on Equity and Electrification of Transportation, Friday, October 23, from 10 am – 2:30 pm, will discuss broader reforms to our transportation systems through the lens of law, policy, and business. Register here.

Supreme Court nominee hedges on climate change

CLIMATE: Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett says in a confirmation hearing that she does not have “firm views” on climate change. (HuffPost)

ALSO:
• A conservation group says Trump administration delays to a key national climate assessment are “outrageous and dangerous.” (The Hill)
• President Trump signs an executive order committing the U.S. to a global tree-planting initiative, while an order to open a protected national forest to logging is still pending. (The Hill)
• A Hawaii county files a lawsuit against 20 oil companies seeking compensation for the rising costs of climate change, including the threat of sea level rise. (InsideClimate News)
• New Jersey is rewriting regulations that would require developers to include a “climate impact analysis” to include future risk potential caused by rising seas and storms. (NJ Spotlight)

***SPONSORED LINK: The University of Minnesota Law, Policy, and Business Conference on Equity and Electrification of Transportation, Friday, October 23, from 10 am – 2:30 pm, will discuss broader reforms to our transportation systems through the lens of law, policy, and business. Register here.